Announcements

This page contains news about new books,  upcoming events, calls for papers, and more. Chapter members also receive this information via email in a monthly bulletin.

Please send us news!  Email announcements to Margot Lystra (margot.lystra@umontreal.ca).


NEW BOOKS


Georges Farhat ed., Landscapes of Preindustrial Urbanism (Washington D.C.:  Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Trustees for Harvard University, 2020).

Stephen H. Whiteman, Where Dragon Veins Meet: The Kangxi Emperor and His Estate at Rehe (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020).

Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, editor, The Culture of Cultivation: Recovering the Roots of Landscape Architecture (Routledge, 2020).

Mary G. Padua, Hybrid Modernity: The Public Park in late 20th century China (Routledge, 2020).

Marc Treib, Thinking a Modern Landscape Architecture, West & East: Christopher Tunnard, Sutemi Horiguchi (Novato CA: ORO Editions, 2020).


Events


Dumbarton Oaks Public Lecture in Garden and Landscape Studies

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City
A. K. Sandoval-Strausz, Associate Professor of History, The Pennsylvania State University
November 12, 4:00 pm (EST)
A. K. Sandoval-Strausz illuminates the indispensable role Latin American immigrants have played in reviving American cities.

Details and registration here

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The New York Botanical Garden Humanities Institute  symposium:

First Nations: Ethical Landscapes, Sacred Plants
Nov. 13, 11:00 am-12:30 pm (EST)
Convened by the NYBG Humanities Institute in partnership with Yale University and the Mellon Foundation, this Symposium will offer a vital discussion among five Native American experts relating to Indigenous lands, landscape and environment.

Details and registration here

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Online Winter Lecture Series 2020/21
Twelve lectures from 5 October 2020 to 22 March 2021, organized jointly by The Gardens Trust and The London Gardens Trust

16 November: ‘To promote his Majesties purpose’: Joseph Banks and his Global Botanical Projects, 1770-1820 – Professor Jordan Goodman, University College, London

30 November: Pulhamite in London, 1820-2020 – How one man’s rocky creation became the fashionable garden feature of the Victorian and Edwardian era – Valerie Christman, The Pulham Legacy

14 December: Wentworth Castle and Wentworth Woodhouse: Georgian rivals – Dr Patrick Eyres, Editor, New Arcadian Journal

11 January 2021: Biodiversity & the Wild West End Project: Encouraging Birds, Bees & Bats into the Heart of London – Tom Gray, Senior Ecological Consultant, Arup

25 January: The Integration of Derek Jarman’s Garden – Professor Michael Charlesworth, University of Texas

8 February: Too Young to be Loved? Post-war designed landscapes of London and environs– Karen Fitzsimon CMLI, landscape architect and garden historian

22 February: Transatlantic slavery’s long reach: The impacts of direct and indirect slavery connections on eighteenth century estate gardens and parks – Professor Susanne Seymour, University of Nottingham

8 March: Dinosaurs, Italian Terraces and Future Sustainability: Crystal Palace Park – Kathryn Whitmore, Associate Landscape Architect, AECOM and others

22 March: What is Wild? – Dr Kim Wilkie, Landscape Architect

All lectures will be recorded and all ticket holders will be sent a link to the recording the day after the lecture. The recording will be available for one week.

All lectures and booking online. Tickets: £4 for Gardens Trust/all County Gardens Trusts members, £6 for non-members; season tickets £40/£60 via The Gardens Trust. Details at: https://bookwhen.com/londongardenstrust/e/ev-sg7x-20201005180000


Opportunities


Call for event submissions:
Landscape Research Group Annual Symposium:
Landscape and Goodness
5-10 December 2020
Online; events will be various times

2020 has often offered a relentless focus on the negative. For our Annual Symposium in December we wish to focus enthusiastically upon the positive. Over 5-10 December, we will host online a series of live and recorded events, inspired by the work of eminent human geographer Yi-Fu Tuan, on landscape and goodness. To celebrate Tuan’s 90th birthday on 5 December, we’ll be speaking to him in conversation, which begins our programme of global events – submitted by you! – exploring how landscapes can contribute to well-being and social good.

The word ‘landscape’ can denote two different ways of thinking about people’s place in the world. On the one hand, it places human beings at the centre of things, where virtue is to be found in crafting ‘scapes’ or ‘scenes’. On the other, it suggests that we are just one part of complex ecological ecosystems, part of the ‘land’, where virtue is to be found acting humbly as a member of that community.  Which of these virtues will it be in the 21st century? The goodness of vaunting creativity or the goodness of letting be?

We are seeking contributions from all over the world in any time zone at any time during 5-10 December. Contributions in any virtual format will be considered, for example:

  • live panels
  • virtual social gatherings
  • walks
  • conversations
  • film screenings
  • performances of dance or music…

… anything. We encourage events to be light in terms of the organisation required, and short in length. There is no minimum length, but a maximum of one hour. The only requirements are that at least one participant in each contribution must be a Landscape Research Group member (join here) and that each must also address the theme of ‘landscape and goodness’ and/or address the challenge above. Each selected contribution to the event programme will receive an honorarium of £200.

Deadline for submissions is Thursday 12 November. Details here.

The events will be open to the public to attend; booking will open when the event programme is finalised in mid-November. All events will be recorded and subsequently added to our new online platform, the Landscape Exchange (LEX).

ANCHOR

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Call for Papers:

The Future of Architecture and Urbanism in the Post-COVID Age
Presented by the Epidemic Urbanism Initiative

Long before the appearance of COVID-19, the urban fabric of cities across the world had been shaped by prior epidemics. Indeed, the study of historic, global epidemics has illuminated the many ways in which urban life and architecture have changed during times of pestilence. With the outbreak of each epidemic has come new scientific understandings of disease, new modes of governing of social life and interaction, novel efforts to intervene in and prevent infection, the exacerbation of social inequities, and the creation of new occupational and social roles. Each of these outcomes has been enacted and emplaced in the built environment over time and across diverse geographies through the design or re-design of buildings and public spaces, the quarantine or redirection of goods and people, the adoption of new social roles, and the imposition of new urban design policies and practices.

Now, almost a year into the COVID-19 global pandemic, we can take stock of the impacts of this pandemic on cities and begin to imagine a post-COVID urban landscape. These ideas in mind, for its fourth conference, the Epidemic Urbanism Initiative (EUI) seeks papers that explore the present and future implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic.

Papers may be submitted for the following five tracks:

  • Response and Experience – Papers in this category will address how urban and rural communities are experiencing or responding to COVID-19; how governments have envisioned or imposed interventions and their impact on urban communities; the ways in which communities are responding to or resisting such interventions; or artistic or behavioral responses to the disease; how the epidemic has shifted social practices and experiences in public and domestic spaces; and the future of urban institutions including museums, schools, workplaces, and city services.
  • Design and Interventions – Papers in this category will address the design, implementation, and experience of architectural interventions to cope with COVID-19 and its impacts; the future of technologies, scientific practices, and innovation, especially in design; the future of architectural firms; and short and long term impacts of social distancing and tele-working on urban development and architectural design.
  • Health Equity and Social Justice – Papers in this category will explore differential implications of COVID-19 for practices and settings of health, health care, and health promotion; how the pandemic has exposed or exacerbated social and economic inequities; how the pandemic has affected vulnerable populations, communities of color, migrants, refugees, and the elderly; how the epidemic has amplified racism across the world and the impacts of each on urban life and experience; art and design interventions to address social justice in the COVID and post-COVID era; and future priorities for social justice, equity, and inclusion in a post-COVID world.
  • Education and Pedagogy – Papers in this category will explore the impact of pandemics on higher education, especially in fields related to the built environment; how the pandemic has affected architectural curriculum in the short and long terms; the opportunities and challenges of remote teaching in the COVID era; and the ways in which COVID-19 has impacted the educational experience for students.
  • Environment and Sustainability – Papers in this category will explore the direct and indirect impacts of COVID-19 on urban and natural environments, sustainability, and environmental justice; impacts of climate change and global warming on the susceptibility of urban and rural communities to infectious illness; and human and built responses to the impacts of these ecological issues.

Submissions should be no longer than 250 words and must clearly speak to one of the above categories, be centered on a case study or a geographic location, and engage the built environment in some way. Proposals also should be forward-looking, but rooted in evidence-based and empirical observation, and could engage a range of methods including literature reviews, empirical studies, pedagogical experiments, historical research, interviews, or artistic production. We encourage submissions from across the world and from a wide
range of disciplines, including but not limited to architecture, urban planning, landscape, public health, social work, medicine, art and design.

Please send your proposal and a short, 2-page CV to Drs. Mohammad Gharipour and Caitlin DeClercq at epidemicurbanism@gmail.com by Friday, November 27th, 2020.

This virtual conference is sponsored by the AIA Design & Health Research Consortium (DHRC).

The Epidemic Urbanism Initiative (EUI) was founded by Dr. Mohammad Gharipour and Dr. Caitlin DeClercq in May 2020. As part of this initiative, Drs. Gharipour and DeClercq have organized two international conferences on historic pandemics and a roundtable on “Cities, Social Equity, and Pandemics in History.” The EUI has created a group of 1200 scholars from more than fifty
countries. The EUI YouTube channel, which includes lectures and interviews with visionary scholars and public health leaders, has already become a reference for professors and researchers in a wide range of disciplines.

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The Foundation for Landscape Studies invites you to submit publications from your press for this year’s John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and David R. Coffin Publication Grant. Please see the list of all winners of these prizes on the website.

The John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize is awarded to books published in the last three years that have made a significant contribution to the study and understanding of garden history and landscape design. The David R. Coffin Publication Grant supports the production of a publication of a manuscript under contract in the field of landscape studies.  

Award recipients will be selected by a jury composed of members of the Board of Directors of the Foundation for Landscape Studies. Detailed descriptions of the eligibility requirements and the application procedures for each award can be found on the website. The application deadline for both awards is December 1, 2020.   

We welcome nominations for the John Brinckerhoff Jackson Book Prize and the David R. Coffin Publication Grant from both publishers and authors.  

Please submit all inquiries to:
Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, President
Foundation for Landscape Studies
elizabethbarlowrogers@gmail.com  

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Dumbarton Oaks Mellon Fellowships in Urban Landscape Studies are for cross-disciplinary scholars in urban landscape studies (PhD or MLA preference), and History Teaching Fellowships are for current faculty members in universities/other secondary educational institutions.  Application deadline: December 1

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The Department of Urban and Rural Development at SLU Uppsala
announces a PhD position in Landscape Architecture with focus on Landscape Aesthetics and exploratory methods.
https://www.slu.se/om-slu/jobba-pa-slu/lediga-tjanster/
https://www.slu.se/en/about-slu/work-at-slu/jobs-vacancies/
Deadline for application is December 4, 2020.

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Call for Sessions:
SAH 2022 Annual International Conference

Pittsburgh, Apr 27-May 1, 2022
Deadline Jan 12, 2021

ANCHOR

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Call for Papers:

Landscapes of Slavery, Landscapes of Freedom: The African diaspora and the American built environment
Harvard Graduate School of Design
November 5-7, 2021

Histories of the Atlantic world have focused both on the adaptation of ideas from the Old Continent to the new and on the material and cultural exchanges occurring throughout the centuries. To complement this scholarship, studies have been conducted on the slave trade between West Africa, mainland North America and the Caribbean, which formed the base of plantation economy and helped build the fortunes of many landowners in the colonial and antebellum period of the republic. Recent scholarship has acknowledged the violence of the archive of white records of slavery that have silenced the voices of the enslaved, and this work has sought to recover the experiences and vantage points of slavery’s victims.

This forum will address a more specific set of questions that have to do not only with the unique contribution the forced labor of the African diaspora and Afro-descendants brought to the plantation economy, but also with the potential exchange of knowledge about gardening and cultivation practices across the Atlantic, both from West Africa and between the Caribbean and mainland North America. On occasion the cultivation of specific staple crops such as rice depended upon the expertise of the enslaved. More generally, many of those forced to labor on their masters’ plantations simultaneously worked on small plots of land within their quarters, enabling them to exercise limited agency with regard to the extent and type of crop cultivation for their own use and consumption. When slavery legally ended, the exploitation of black labor continued, although over time black land-ownership increased and perhaps involved different approaches to land use than was common among white small-holders. Reconstructing these histories and those of the environments Africans built and cultivated for others and for themselves is challenging, as there is only a limited archival record that contains few enslaved voices.

This conference seeks to engage with the work of archaeologists, ethnobotanists, cultural geographers, anthropologists, and of experts in African American Studies and oral history in order to form a more complete picture of the African contribution to the shaping of the North American landscape.

Proposals for unpublished papers are welcome from scholars in any field. Topics might include (but are not limited to) such subjects as:

  • the relationship between place-making and slave labor in North America and its cultural, social and economic underpinnings.
  • the adaptation of imported African horticultural and agricultural knowledge in the Caribbean and North America.
  • the exchange of knowledge related to agricultural and gardening practices between the Caribbean and the North American mainland.
  • Atlantic World foodways.
  • crop cultivation and food growing practices on plantation sites indebted to forced labor.
  • the ways in which slavery and forced labor made intensive cultivation and production possible.
  • the place-making of former slaves in both rural and urban environments.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be headed with the applicant’s name, title of the paper, professional affiliation, and contact information. A two-page CV should also be included in the submission.

Please send proposals by March 15, 2021 to Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.
Email: rfabiani@gsd.harvard.edu

Authors of accepted proposals will be required to submit the complete text of their papers by June 15, and carry out potential revisions by August 30, 2021, after which the symposium chair will circulate them among the speakers. Publication of the essays presented at the conference is anticipated.

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