Announcements

This page contains news about new books,  upcoming events, calls for papers, and more. Chapter members also receive this information via email in a monthly bulletin.

Please send us news!  Email announcements to sahlandscape@gmail.com.


NEW BOOKS


Georges Farhat ed., Landscapes of Preindustrial Urbanism (Washington D.C.:  Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, Trustees for Harvard University, 2020).

Stephen H. Whiteman, Where Dragon Veins Meet: The Kangxi Emperor and His Estate at Rehe (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2020).

Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, editor, The Culture of Cultivation: Recovering the Roots of Landscape Architecture (Routledge, 2020).

Mary G. Padua, Hybrid Modernity: The Public Park in late 20th century China (Routledge, 2020).

Marc Treib, Thinking a Modern Landscape Architecture, West & East: Christopher Tunnard, Sutemi Horiguchi (Novato CA: ORO Editions, 2020).


EVENTS

Landscape Citizenships: A Roundtable

Online event sponsored by Yale Environmental History & Yale Environmental Humanities

Oct. 29, 1:30 PM–3:00 PM ET

What would it mean to fully embrace the concept of landscape as a milieu of situated, everyday practices, encompassing the mutually constitutive relations between people and place? And how can landscape studies, a field with roots in Western cartographic and imperial traditions, establish scholarly and activist frameworks that facilitate inclusivity, belonging, and justice? The co-editors of the recently published edited volume Landscape Citizenships (Routledge, 2021) will join Thaïsa Way, Director of Garden and Landscape Studies at Dumbarton Oaks, to consider these and other questions in a roundtable discussion of their new book. The discussants will also reflect upon how their own landscape emplacements and research positions informed the making of the book and its emphasis on democratic modes of landscape thinking and practice.

To register, please click here

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Fondazione Benetton Studi Ricerche International Landscape Study Days:
Bodies, landscapes
Online symposium, Coordinated by Luigi Latini and Simonetta Zanon
February 18-19th and 25-26th

Our bodily presence in a place and the tangible experience of physical reality are one of the reasons we feel we belong in what we call the landscape. At this unprecedented moment in our history, when physical distances and the power of virtual images appear to be heading in opposite directions, the 2021 Study Days explore and revisit events and reflections on landscape culture and practice, where the body is considered an active presence, an essential part of a world which is transformed and reveals itself to us through our physical state.

Without neglecting the clear desire for nature that permeates our society. The days are divided into four sessions entitled in the imagination; in urban space, in the home; in the landscape; in the garden respectively. The intent is not to separate spheres and contexts which, by their very nature, are inextricably linked, but to suggest, with keywords, possible avenues to explore, following fundamental directions which we use to organise our presence in places.

Details and registration here


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The New York Botanical Garden online exhibit, Black Botany: The Nature of Black Experience, seeks to acknowledge the complex relationship between enslaved Black people, nature, and the colonial environment and reconsider the conscious omission of Black knowledge of the natural world.

The exhibit focuses on five plants—cotton, rice, the peacock flower, peanut, and vanilla orchid. These plants offer a unique lens through which to explore the documentary record about the lived experiences of Black people related to the innovation and impact of these plants. The exhibit features several works from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library and Archival Collections of The New York Botanical Garden, along with plant specimens from the William and Lynda Steere Herbarium.

The exhibit was curated by Rashad Bell, MLIS, Collection Maintenance Associate at the Mertz Library, and Nuala Caomhánach, former Humanities Institute Andrew W. Mellon Fellow and Ph.D. candidate at New York University.

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Dumbarton Oaks:
Where Was Jim Crow? Living in Frank Lloyd Wright’s America
Virtual Public Lecture with Dianne Harris
March 4, 4:00-5:30pm

Dianne Harris illuminates architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s role in the history of the divided and segregated American city. Mabel Wilson, Professor of Architecture and Director of the Institute for Research in African American Studies at Columbia University will join Dr. Harris in a discussion following the lecture.

Details and registration

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The Harvard Graduate School of Design Spring 2021 Public Program:
“Think Like a Historian, Imagine Like a Designer: A Conversation on Landscape History and Design Education” 
Thaisa Way, Ed Eigen, and Raffaella Fabiani Gianetto
Online, Friday March 5

History is a manner of thinking about the world, grounded in the places we design, construct, and inhabit. Design offers the opportunity to re-imagine the world around us, today and for the future. We might draw from history, or draw upon it; certainly, it is to be hoped that we are drawn to it, as designers and historians. The purpose of landscape history—not reducible to memory nor timelines nor styles—is to produce and share knowledge of how we have come to be who and where we are. We will gather across studios we collectively inhabit to draw attention to and lessons from the design of history. We will investigate the relationship of history as a craft and design as a mode of inquiry. As landscape historians who have chosen to teach and do their scholarship within the GSD and Harvard design community, we investigate the role of history and its methods and narratives in the understanding of place and cultural relationships to site and landscape. By thinking like a historian, designers might re-imagine both their future and our collective future.

Details and registration here

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Online Winter Lecture Series 2020/21
Twelve lectures from 5 October 2020 to 22 March 2021, organized jointly by The Gardens Trust and The London Gardens Trust

22 February: Transatlantic slavery’s long reach: The impacts of direct and indirect slavery connections on eighteenth century estate gardens and parks – Professor Susanne Seymour, University of Nottingham

8 March: Dinosaurs, Italian Terraces and Future Sustainability: Crystal Palace Park – Kathryn Whitmore, Associate Landscape Architect, AECOM and others

22 March: What is Wild? – Dr Kim Wilkie, Landscape Architect

All lectures will be recorded and all ticket holders will be sent a link to the recording the day after the lecture. The recording will be available for one week.

All lectures and booking online. Tickets: £4 for Gardens Trust/all County Gardens Trusts members, £6 for non-members; season tickets £40/£60 via The Gardens Trust. Details at: https://bookwhen.com/londongardenstrust/e/ev-sg7x-20201005180000

Opportunities

2021 Great Places Awards
Deadline – February 15, 2021

The Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) is happy to announce the Great Places Awards in collaboration with the Project for Public Space.

The Awards seek to recognize work that combines expertise in design, research and practice; and contributes to the creation of dynamic, humane places that engage our attention and imagination.

EDRA accepts submissions in the following categories:

  • Place Design
  • Place Planning
  • Place Research
  • Place Book
  • Place Art

Awardees will be recognized during the GPA Awards Ceremony at EDRA52DETROIT: JUST ENVIRONMENTS virtual conference in May 2021.

Details here

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Position announcement
University of Texas at Austin

Associate or Full Professor (Race and Gender in the Built Environment)

The School of Architecture at UT Austin is seeking an Associate or Full Professor with tenure to serve as a thought leader for its growing initiative on Race and Gender and the Built Environment through their teaching, research, and other academic activity.

A unique history of racial oppression and segregation, as well as cultural norms regarding gender roles, have shaped the built and social environments of American cities and continue to affect their design and development. Urban marginality coupled with racial and gendered social structures persist throughout the Americas, raising questions about the continuing complicity of the planning and design fields in the production of inequitable urban environments. In 2016, the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin established an initiative to strengthen our teaching and research on the relationship between race and/or gender and the built environment. The school first established a rotating Fellow position followed by a tenure-track faculty member in 2018. A senior faculty position is the next element in building transformative approaches to issues of race, gender, and social equity within our disciplines at the school. We aspire to bring a colleague whose work focuses on historically marginalized communities who have been underrepresented in design and planning research, including Black, Latinx, Indigenous, and LGBTQ populations, to fulfill a central role in shaping critical scholarship and design praxis both within the School of Architecture and beyond.

The selected faculty member can choose to affiliate with any of the programs within the school, which include architecture, community and regional planning, historic preservation, architectural history, interior design, landscape architecture, sustainable design, and urban design. In addition, the candidate may also engage scholars across campus in programs, departments and centers such as American Studies, African and African Diaspora Studies, the Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis, the Warfield Center, the Center for the Study of Race and Democracy, and the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies to build interdisciplinary approaches to scholarship and pedagogy. Candidates whose research examines the intersections of race and gender with the built environment and their impacts on marginalized communities throughout the Americas may choose to affiliate with our area studies programs, including the prominent Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies (LLILAS).

The successful candidate will hold a Ph.D. or an advanced professional degree complemented by current research and an active publishing program that demonstrates a rigorous pursuit of issues associated with race and/or gender in the built environment. We are interested in candidates who will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity in higher education through their teaching, research, and service. Review of qualified applicants will begin on Feb 18 and continue until the position is filled.

Application here

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Places Journal
Call for applications: Critics-in-Residence in Architecture and Landscape Architecture
Deadline: Friday 12 March

Applications are now being accepted for Critics-in-Residence in Architecture and Landscape Architecture, a new program supported by a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

In launching this program, Places is seeking to build capacity in the ranks of design writers and to raise the cultural visibility and influence of the design disciplines. For more than a generation, the number of practicing design critics has been dwindling. Yet the need for informed and incisive criticism of architecture and landscape architecture remains pressing. Growing demands for greater urban equity and social justice; the accumulating impacts of the climate crisis; the rapid proliferation of new digital and material technologies; increasing calls for professional reform — all are posing challenges for the design disciplines, and underscoring the importance of serious and sustained critical discussion.

The Critics-in-Residence program will encourage authors to move beyond the limits of the traditional project review and produce wide-ranging essays that are conceptually rich and culturally ambitious, organized around some strong theme or set of ideas.

For this inaugural round, two critics will be selected, one in architecture and one in landscape architecture. Critics will be in (virtual) residence with the journal for a term of one year and receive a stipend of $7,500 to write four major critical essays.

Details and application instructions here


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Call for Papers:

Landscapes of Slavery, Landscapes of Freedom: The African diaspora and the American built environment
Harvard Graduate School of Design
November 5-7, 2021

Histories of the Atlantic world have focused both on the adaptation of ideas from the Old Continent to the new and on the material and cultural exchanges occurring throughout the centuries. To complement this scholarship, studies have been conducted on the slave trade between West Africa, mainland North America and the Caribbean, which formed the base of plantation economy and helped build the fortunes of many landowners in the colonial and antebellum period of the republic. Recent scholarship has acknowledged the violence of the archive of white records of slavery that have silenced the voices of the enslaved, and this work has sought to recover the experiences and vantage points of slavery’s victims.

This forum will address a more specific set of questions that have to do not only with the unique contribution the forced labor of the African diaspora and Afro-descendants brought to the plantation economy, but also with the potential exchange of knowledge about gardening and cultivation practices across the Atlantic, both from West Africa and between the Caribbean and mainland North America. On occasion the cultivation of specific staple crops such as rice depended upon the expertise of the enslaved. More generally, many of those forced to labor on their masters’ plantations simultaneously worked on small plots of land within their quarters, enabling them to exercise limited agency with regard to the extent and type of crop cultivation for their own use and consumption. When slavery legally ended, the exploitation of black labor continued, although over time black land-ownership increased and perhaps involved different approaches to land use than was common among white small-holders. Reconstructing these histories and those of the environments Africans built and cultivated for others and for themselves is challenging, as there is only a limited archival record that contains few enslaved voices.

This conference seeks to engage with the work of archaeologists, ethnobotanists, cultural geographers, anthropologists, and of experts in African American Studies and oral history in order to form a more complete picture of the African contribution to the shaping of the North American landscape.

Proposals for unpublished papers are welcome from scholars in any field. Topics might include (but are not limited to) such subjects as:

  • the relationship between place-making and slave labor in North America and its cultural, social and economic underpinnings.
  • the adaptation of imported African horticultural and agricultural knowledge in the Caribbean and North America.
  • the exchange of knowledge related to agricultural and gardening practices between the Caribbean and the North American mainland.
  • Atlantic World foodways.
  • crop cultivation and food growing practices on plantation sites indebted to forced labor.
  • the ways in which slavery and forced labor made intensive cultivation and production possible.
  • the place-making of former slaves in both rural and urban environments.

Abstracts of no more than 500 words are to be headed with the applicant’s name, title of the paper, professional affiliation, and contact information. A two-page CV should also be included in the submission.

Please send proposals by March 15, 2021 to Raffaella Fabiani Giannetto, Graduate School of Design, Harvard University.
Email: rfabiani@gsd.harvard.edu

Authors of accepted proposals will be required to submit the complete text of their papers by June 15, and carry out potential revisions by August 30, 2021, after which the symposium chair will circulate them among the speakers. Publication of the essays presented at the conference is anticipated.

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The Garden and Landscape Studies program at Dumbarton Oaks announces two opportunities for students.

The Garden and Landscape Studies Graduate Workshop —for PhD candidates, MLA candidates, and recent MLA recipients, who received their degree within the last three years, is intended to develop the field of garden and landscape studies across distinct and related disciplines and to promote the depth and breadth of future landscape and garden history scholarship.  This year’s focus will be: “Public Landscapes and Public Health: An Inquiry into the Histories of Landscape Design.” The intensive virtual workshop is scheduled for May 10–28, 2021. Upon successful completion of the workshop and submission of the final project and required documentation, participants receive an honorarium of $1,500.

The Bliss Symposium Award is for currently enrolled graduate students and undergraduate juniors and seniors wishing to attend the virtual spring symposium, “Land Back: Indigenous Landscapes of Resurgence and Freedom” scheduled for every other Thursday from April 29–June 10, 2021. Successful applicants will receive complimentary registration to attend the symposium and up to five Dumbarton Oaks publications, of their choosing.

The application deadline for both is March 15, 2021.  Please share with your students and your colleagues.